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Concerto For Organ/Petit/Barber album mp3

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Concerto For Organ/Petit/Barber album mp3
  • Title:
    Concerto For Organ/Petit/Barber
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    1902 megabytes
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    1575 megabytes
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    1762 megabytes
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This album has an average beat per minute of BPM (slowest/fastest tempos:, BPM). Tracklist Poulenc: Concerto for Organ, Petit: Concertino, Barber: Toccata Festiva. 1. Concerto for Organ, Strings and Timpani in G minor.

Poulenc: Concerto for Organ; Petit: Concertino; Barber: Toccata Festiva. Concerto for Organ features David Hill and Raymond Leppard conducting organist Gillian Weir and the English Chamber Orchestra on five performances. The first performance is a Francis Poulenc composition, "Concerto for Organ, Strings and Timpani in G Minor," while the next three are Pierre Petit concertinos and the final a Samuel Barber composition, "Roccata Festiva Op. 3.

Concerto For Organ/Petit/Barber. Concerto For Organ/Petit/Barber. Linn Records 160. CD.

It is a magnificent score, movingly and thrillingly performed here – and, as in Petit's Concertino, Dame Gillian is excellently accompanied by Raymond Leppard.

Splendid performances with a big, natural resonant "church" sound.

The Concerto pour orgue, cordes et timbales (Concerto for organ, timpani and strings) in G minor, FP 93, is an organ concerto composed by Francis Poulenc between 1934 and 1938. It has become one of the most frequently performed pieces of the genre not written in the Baroque period. The organ concerto was commissioned by Princess Edmond de Polignac in 1934, as a piece with a chamber orchestra accompaniment and an easy organ part that the princess could probably play herself

The American composer Samuel Barber was – depending on who you talk to – either one of the most talented lyrical composers of his generation, or one of the most anachronistic and old fashioned in the 20th century, deaf to the latest ideas and musical trends. As for his only Violin Concerto, that too seemed to divide opinions. For the young virtuoso violinist for whom it was written it was initially too dull, but then ultimately unplayable! Or at least, that’s what we’ve always been led to believe.